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Sliding Pillar Lubrication

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marsha1ben Ben G
Parker, USA   USA
I am rebuilding a 54 Morgan. The front pillars have been rebuilt. The original oiler system appears to be intact. I have read in the "Notes from a Morgan Garage" that it maybe advisable to replace the oiler system with grease zerks. I would like to hear from other forum members which system they prefer. Thanks.

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DuncanCharlton Avatar
DuncanCharlton Duncan Charlton
Elgin, Texas, USA   USA
1931 Morgan 3 Wheeler "Gwenda (Sold)"
1967 Morgan 4/4 "Toly's Car"
1967 Unknown Unknown
1970 Mini Countryman    & more
I have disconnected the one-shot oiler, preferring to grease the sliders (stub axle assemblies) through the existing zerk fitting on the slider. If you use the oiler with original type kingpins, the oil dribbles out of the side of the kingpin and ends up on the outside of the slider, i.e.: it doesn't get into grease reservoir and a bit can end up on the brakes. There are some aftermarket kingpins that are drilled so that the lubricant exits inside of the reservoir (maybe 3" lower than the original type?) and with those it would make sense to use grease instead.

Since grease would need to be applied to the top of the kingpins instead of directly into the sliders, why not add pipes that move the grease entry point into a location where you don't have to get on the floor (which you have to anyhow in order to grease the sliders)? You could add a threaded fitting (like a brake pipe) and some tubing to move the zerk fitting into the engine compartment. I know a guy in Washington state who put a grease gun (the kind on which you twist a handle to force grease through) under his dash so he could grease on the fly.

BTW -- the main cause of significant wear on the lower bushings seems to be the abrasion caused by rust on the lower part of the kingpin. I no longer use mild steel and instead use hard chromed kingpins after having seen how quickly the stainless steel ones wore. If you're using mild steel kingpins, I suggest you fabricate a gaiter to cover the lower rebound spring. That will keep grease in, but more importantly, keep water and grit out. I've made several sets of these from scraps of suede and clipped the ends together with rivets or small bolts. See photo.


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marsha1ben Ben G
Parker, USA   USA
Duncan,

Thank you! I appreciate a picture of the gator. Now I will figure out where to put the zerk. Thanks again for the info.

Ben

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DuncanCharlton Avatar
DuncanCharlton Duncan Charlton
Elgin, Texas, USA   USA
1931 Morgan 3 Wheeler "Gwenda (Sold)"
1967 Morgan 4/4 "Toly's Car"
1967 Unknown Unknown
1970 Mini Countryman    & more
This location (just above the shock mount on the slider) should allow you to grease the bushings in the slider. You may need a 90 degree zerk. I left mine slightly loose so I could rotate it by hand into the position that was easiest to reach with a grease gun.


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